Skip Navigation

Holiday Recipes

Matzah Ball Soup

Matzah balls are more traditionally known as knaydelach (Yiddish for dumplings). Matzah ball soup is generally a very thin chicken broth with two or three ping-pong-ball sized matzah balls (or sometimes one very large matzah ball) in it. Sometimes, a few large pieces of carrot or celery are added. Matzah balls can be very soft and light or firm and heavy -- sometimes the two types are referred to as "floaters and sinkers." Matzah ball soup is a staple at all Jewish holidays.

Svinge - fried sweet dough

Svinge — Fried Sweet Dough

Svinge is a fried sweet dough and is a Hanukkah favorite.

Tzimmes

Tzimmes is any kind of sweet stew. It usually is orange in color, and includes carrots, sweet potatoes and/or prunes. A wide variety of dishes fall under the heading tzimmes.

Apple Kugel (Apple Pudding)

Apples are a traditional food and is accompanied by a prayer recited just before eating them. Additionally, apples are traditionally incorporated into the recipes of the festive meal itself

Ashkenazi Haroset

<em>Haroset</em> is a mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine, which are finely chopped or blended into a paste-like consistency. <em>Haroset</em> is meant to look like the mortar that the enslaved Israelites were forced to use to build Egyptian cities. However, <em>haroset</em> tastes sweet, which reminds us that even in bitter times, we can always find something sweet in our lives and that bitter times are eventually followed by the sweetness of salvation.

Blintzes (Shavout)

Throughout the Western world people eat crepe suzettes. Blintzes are the Jewish eastern European version of the French treat. The word "blintz" comes from a Ukrainian word meaning "pancake." The Israeli bent on having a light meal in the evening, after a theater performance or movie, will choose from among a number of specialty restaurants serving this delicacy with a choice of several different fillings.

Creamy Potato Leek Soup - Resource/Shavuot

Creamy Potato Leek Soup

With its creamy potato base, this soup is a tradition on the table during Shavuot.

Hamentaschen (Purim)

On Purim, Jews are commanded to send out gifts of food or drink, and to make gifts to charity. The sending of gifts of food and drink is referred to as shalach manot (lit. sending out portions). Among Ashkenazic Jews, a common treat at this time of year is hamentaschen (lit. Haman's pockets). These triangular fruit-filled cookies are supposed to represent Haman's three-cornered hat.

Keftes de Prasa (Leek Patties)

This is a tradition to celebrate Rosh HaShanah and also as a sign of spring.

Items 1 - 9 of 27  123Next
Landscape photo of Jerusalem with the Dome of the Rock in the foreground.

Visit Israel

Here you’ll find an array of useful information on accommodations, transportation, exchanging currency, Israel's climate and customs, and much more. So get the most out of your trip to Israel with the help of The Fellowship.

Read More

About The Fellowship (IFCJ)

The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (IFCJ) funds humanitarian aid to the needy in Israel and in Jewish communities around the world, promotes prayer and advocacy on behalf of the Jewish state, and provides resources that help build bridges of understanding between Christians and Jews.

Read More