Recipes


Close up image of crispy potato pancakes.

Let’s Make Potato Latkes for Hanukkah!

On Hanukkah, it is traditional to eat foods made with oil in commemoration of the miracle of the menorah. When the Jews reached the Temple, they only found one jar of olive oil, enough to keep the eternal flame of the menorah lit for one day. In faith, they lit the menorah, and miraculously, the flame lasted for eight nights until more pure oil could be found.
A plate of vegetable pizza latkes

Pizza Latkes

Spice up your Hanukkah meal with cheesiness!
Sweet Potato Latkes

Spaghetti Squash Latkes

Try this low-carb treat with your favorite dipping sauce!

Matzah Ball Soup

Matzah balls are more traditionally known as knaydelach (Yiddish for dumplings). Matzah ball soup is generally a very thin chicken broth with two or three ping-pong-ball sized matzah balls (or sometimes one very large matzah ball) and is a staple at all Jewish holidays.
A plate of fried sweet dough known as Svinge in Hebrew

Svinge – Fried Sweet Dough

Svinge is a fried sweet dough and is a Hanukkah favorite.
Freshly baked apple kugel

Apple Kugel (Apple Pudding)

Apples are a traditional food and is accompanied by a prayer recited just before eating them. Additionally, apples are traditionally incorporated into the recipes of the festive meal itself
Close up image of haroset in a bowl.

Ashkenazi Haroset

Haroset is a mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine, which are finely chopped or blended into a paste-like consistency. Haroset is meant to look like the mortar that the enslaved Israelites were forced to use to build Egyptian cities. However, Haroset tastes sweet, which reminds us that even in bitter times, we can always find something sweet in our lives and that bitter times are eventually followed by the sweetness of salvation.

Baba Ganouj (Eggplant with Tehina)

In Israel, it is not unusual for guests to drop in for a visit without prior notice. In such cases, they are likely to get a light snack or impromptu meal. In anticipation of such contingencies, one such prepared dish is baba ghanouj, which can be found in virtually every Israeli refrigerator.

Avocado Salad

Judging by its popularity, you would think that the avocado has been grown in Israel for many years. In fact, until recently, they were not grown in Israel at all. Today, the avocado is an Israeli favorite and avocado fields dot the countryside.
Delicious and flakey Baklava with a piece cut out of the side

Baklava (Honey and Nut Pastry)

Baklava is a delicacy found throughout the Arab world. The Jews who came to Israel from Arab countries continue to prepare and enjoy the taste of baklava. This sweet pastry is sold in both Jewish and Arab markets, and comes in a multitude of varieties.
Traditional Jewish Blintzes deep fried on a plate

Blintzes (Shavout)

Throughout the Western world people eat crepe suzettes. Blintzes are the Jewish eastern European version of the French treat. The word "blintz" comes from a Ukrainian word meaning "pancake." The Israeli bent on having a light meal in the evening, after a theater performance or movie, will choose from among a number of specialty restaurants serving this delicacy with a choice of several different fillings.
A metal pot filled with curry chicken and vegetables

Chicken Curry

After its independence, Israel discovered a new Jewish community -- the Cochin Jews of India. Tradition has it that these Jews were exiled to India after the destruction of the Second Temple. Though outwardly resembling Indians, the Cochin Jews maintain their distinctive tradition. One of their principal dishes is chicken curry which has now been incorporated into Israeli cuisine.

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