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Pray for God’s Promises

Pray for God’s Promises

Credit:(Photo: Beatrice Preve/500px)

Moses inspected the work and saw that they had done it just as the LORD had commanded. So Moses blessed them. — Exodus 39:43

Prayer in Judaism is defined as “the work of the heart,” which profoundly changes the nature of prayer from one of entreating God to an act that transforms who we are – not what God does. Our devotions are focused on different facets of prayer and what lessons we can learn about the power of our prayers. Allow us to take your prayers to the holiest site in all Judaism, the Western Wall. Submit your prayer request today.

In Exodus chapter 39, we learn about that the work of building the Tabernacle and the holy vessels had been completed. Scripture tells us, “Moses inspected the work and saw that they had done it just as the LORD had commanded. So Moses blessed them.” Moses was pleased with the work that the children of Israel had done and so he blessed them. However, Scripture doesn’t tell us what Moses actually said.

The Jewish sages explain that the words of Moses’ blessing at that momentous point in history are the same words found in Psalm 90, a psalm prefaced with “A prayer of Moses the man of God” (Psalm 90). Specifically, it was the very last verse of this psalm with which Moses blessed Israel: “May the favor of the Lord our God rest on us; establish the work of our hands for us—yes, establish the work of our hands” (Psalm 90:17). It makes perfect sense that Moses would say these words upon the completion of the Tabernacle. It is a prayer and a blessing that God’s presence should rest amongst the people through the Tabernacle, the work of their hands.

The question is why did Moses need to pray for and bless the people with God’s presence in the first place? In Exodus 25:8, God already had promised, “Then have them make a sanctuary for me, and I will dwell among them.” Why was it necessary for Moses to pray for a promise that God had already made?

Back in Genesis 2, in the story of Creation, Scripture tells us that although God had created everything but man by day number six, there still wasn’t any rain or vegetation. The Jewish sages explain that God could have sent the rain, but He wanted man to pray for it first. After Adam was created and he asked God for sustenance, that’s when the Garden of Eden blossomed with every kind of fruit and vegetable that Adam could ever want.

The lesson for us is that even when something is promised and destined to happen, we still have to pray for it. Our prayers are the conduit for God’s promises.

That’s why Moses had to pray and bless the people with God’s presence. It had been promised, but it still had to be prayed for. This is true on a personal level as well. God has promised us many blessings, but we still need to pray for it.

What will you pray for today?

Allow us to take your prayer request to the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Submit your prayer today.

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