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The Fellowship Offers Security Aid to France's Jews

Claude Sarrabia

In the wake of the terror attacks in Paris, the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (The Fellowship) has announced plans to aid France’s Jewish community.

The IFCJ pledged nearly $90,000 to bolster security at 25 synagogues and schools run by Chabad, including in Paris and Toulouse. The money will go toward hiring additional guards and electronic security systems.

“The fellowship is also considering other steps to help improve security for the entire French-Jewish community,” the group announced.

“Amid the horrific terrorist attacks in Paris, it is critical that we help better protect French-Jewish communal institutions, which have been targets in the past,” IFCJ founder Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein explained. “At the same time, we are extending our immediate support to any French Jew who wishes to leave France and make aliya to Israel.” . . .

“It is vital that the Jews of France know we stand side-by-side with them and will do whatever is necessary to help their community at this challenging time,” Eckstein said, adding that the IFCJ is running several programs to help new immigrants to Israel with rent, employment counseling and Hebrew lessons.

Tags: IFCJ , Crisis and Need

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The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (IFCJ) funds humanitarian aid to the needy in Israel and in Jewish communities around the world, promotes prayer and advocacy on behalf of the Jewish state, and provides resources that help build bridges of understanding between Christians and Jews.

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