Over 1,000 Holocaust Victims Buried After Mass Grave Discovered

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While the more than 100,000 survivors of the Holocaust who are still alive remind us each and every day of the evils of anti-Semitism and hatred, those who perished during this dark chapter in history also alert us to what can happen if we do not stand for what is right. Such was the case last week, NPR’s Sasha Ingber tells us, when the remains of more than 1,000 Jews from Belarus were discovered and then given the proper burial they did not receive after they were murdered during the Holocaust:

More than 1,000 victims of the Holocaust were buried Wednesday in Belarus, some 70 years after they were killed in the genocide.

Their bones were unearthed this winter by construction workers as they began to build luxury apartments in the southwestern city of Brest, near Poland.

Soldiers brought in to excavate found undisputed evidence of a mass grave: skulls with bullet holes, shoes and tattered clothing worn on the last day of people’s lives.

Because the newly uncovered mass grave was on the site of a wartime ghetto, the victims were believed to be Jews slaughtered by Nazis. Many Jewish people had been forced to live behind barbed wires in the Brest ghetto before they were executed.

On Wednesday, their remains were placed into 120 coffins decorated with the Star of David, according to The Associated Press. A burial and ceremony was held at a cemetery outside of the city.

“I think it’s very late, but better late than never,” Marcel Drimer, an 85-year-old Holocaust survivor from Poland, told NPR…

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