Our Passover Journey

Our Passover Journey

Credit:(Photo: iStock)

Each year on the first night of Passover, Jewish mothers and fathers tell their children the story of the Exodus, the time when, in a miraculous chain of events, God elevated a tribe of slaves to be His chosen nation.

The obligation for each parent to tell their children the story of the Exodus goes well beyond the necessity to preserve Jewish culture and heritage. The story of the Exodus is the story of our faith. It is at the heart of our belief not just in a Creator, but One who created mankind for the higher purpose of carrying out His plan for humanity.

Recalling and reaffirming our belief in miracles during Passover attests not only to our belief in a living God, but also confirms our commitment to this higher purpose He calls us to strive towards.

Only once we have tasted the bitterness of oppression can we truly understand the light of redemption. And so on Passover, we tell our children that our ancestors were once slaves, and that our journey from the Exodus onward began in the forced labor camps of Pharaoh.

Our task on Passover is to remember that our ancestors left Egypt in the most miraculous way. Our ancestors’ escape, after more than two hundred years in captivity at the hands of that era’s greatest military and cultural power, was completely unimaginable, and its occurrence has changed the course of history for the Jewish people and for all humankind.

The details of each miracle of the Ten Plagues that we describe to our children on Passover impress on our hearts and the hearts of our children the fact that God dwells with us here on earth. He did then, and He dwells with us to this day – a living God.

When we are attuned to this deeper truth, we begin our own journey out of slavery to redemption – and our Passover journey becomes ever more meaningful.

– Ami Farkas

Tags: Inspiration

More From Fellowship Blog

Fellowship Blog

Technion Team Develops Medical Glue to Replace Stitches in Serious Injuries

Israeli researchers developed a nontoxic glue to put the human body back together after serious injuries both externally and internally reports the Times of Israel.

Fellowship Blog

Faces of The Fellowship: Dvora

Dvora knows all about the biblical city of Tiberias, where she has lived most of her life. Today, she’s 90 years old and still cherishes memories of her youth in this holy city.

Fellowship Blog

Filling the Vacuum

Fellowship partner Shlomi Peles of the Federation of Jewish Communities of the FSU writes to the Jerusalem Post not only to lament Rabbi Eckstein's passing, but to laud the bright future of The Fellowship.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Stay informed about issues affecting Israel, the Jewish people, Jewish-Christian relations, receive daily devotionals, and more.