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Trusting God in Difficult Times

Trusting God in Difficult Times

Credit:flickr/Michael Swan

Trusting God during difficult times:

Whoever dwells in the shelter of the Most High
will rest in the shadow of the Almighty.
I will say of the LORD, “He is my refuge and my fortress,
my God, in whom I trust.”
— Psalm 91:1-2

Jews around the world are observing Sukkot, also known as the Feast of the Tabernacles. In contrast to the solemnity of the High Holy Days, Sukkot is one of Judaism’s most joyous holidays, focusing on thanksgiving and gratitude. During this time, our devotions are tied to this biblically mandated holiday. As this is a non-working holiday, these devotions were prepared in advance for you. To learn more about Sukkot, download our complimentary Bible study.

When I sit in my sukkah, the huts that we are commanded to live in for seven days out of the year, I am reminded of the way that our ancestors had lived for many years. In the Bible, God specifies that we are to recall how He placed the Israelites in similar structures when they wandered the desert for 40 years. Some say that God provided huts for every family in the desert, while others explain that God’s Clouds of Glory had sheltered His people. Either way, the sukkah celebrates God’s providence in a difficult and dangerous environment.

However, beyond those years, I am reminded of the thousands of years that my people lived in simple lodgings, never knowing if they would have to pick up and move again the next year due to persecution or decree. The term “wandering Jew” wasn’t created out of nothing. In a way, the sukkah represents the story of the Jewish people. Our residences were only temporary, our existence precarious, and our survival totally dependent on God’s grace and mercy.

There is a beautiful Yiddish song that poetically captures the essence of this very idea. In the song, a Jewish man tells of sitting in his flimsy sukkah while the winds blow. The weather becomes so foreboding that the man’s wife yells at him to come inside because she worries that the sukkah might blow down and collapse altogether. Listen to his reply: “ . . . don‘t worry about the wind. No matter how many winds will roar. No matter how many generations will come, the sukkah will always remain standing.”

In other words, no matter how many forces have come out against the Jewish people, our people and our tiny nation have always survived and will survive; not because we are strong and mighty, not because we are great and many, but because it is the will of God.

As we dwell in our sukkah shacks with their thatched rooves exposed to the elements, we remember that our well-being comes not from the sound structure of our normal homes, but from God’s providence even in the most delicate situations. What looks solid might be a house of cards if it is not based on the will of God, and what seems flimsy can be the most solid structure if God Himself is holding it up.

Let’s all be encouraged in trusting God during difficult times. With God by our side, the winds may blow and the rain may pour, but we will remain standing. If we are weak, He will strengthen us; if we are tired, He will invigorate us; and if we should fall, He will catch us. Just as He always has.

Discover the connection between Sukkot and the act of giving thanks with our complimentary Bible study on Sukkot, Thanksgiving: An Act of Joy and Humility.

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