Making Our Homes a Space of Holiness

Yael Eckstein  |  November 12, 2020

Eckstein family model Passover seder
Passover model seder Yael and her family sitting around table, smiling

Isaac brought her into the tent of his mother Sarah, and he married Rebekah. So she became his wife, and he loved her; and Isaac was comforted after his mother’s death. — Genesis 24:67

Each week in synagogue, Jews read through the Torah from Genesis to Deuteronomy. The Torah portion for this week is Chayei Sarah, which means “the life of Sarah,” from Genesis 23:1—25:18.

On the day my husband and I moved into our first home in Israel, we celebrated and thanked God for the blessing of a house in the Holy Land where we could raise our family. But mostly, we prayed. We prayed that our home would be a space of holiness, a place where we could raise godly children, and where God might dwell among us.

In this week’s Torah portion, we read, “Isaac was comforted after his mother’s death” once he married Rebekah. However, according to Jewish tradition, Isaac was comforted by much more than the love of his wife. With Rebekah’s entrance into Isaac’s tent, a part of Sarah returned, too.

Tradition teaches that while Sarah was alive, there were three constant miracles in her home — the Sabbath candles burned all week long, the bread never got stale or moldy, and God’s Clouds of Glory always rested above the tent. When Sarah left this world, the miracles left, too. However, when Isaac married Rebekah, the miracles returned.

The miracles in the homes of both matriarchs reflected the holiness of the women who lived inside them.

The lasting candlelight represented the warmth and insight that both women offered to others. The fresh bread reflected the fresh enthusiasm that both women brought to their service of God every day. The Clouds of Glory were symbolic of God’s constant presence in the Matriarchs’ home. They spoke of Him, prayed to Him, and ran their home according to His ways.

We, too, can make our homes into a space of holiness, where God’s presence and blessings abound. Make your home a place of love and light and a space where people can rest and revive. Make it a godly space that reminds people of God. Fill your home with prayers and words of Scripture. And remember that Sarah’s tent, as well as Rebekah’s, was open on all four sides, making it a welcoming place for strangers and family alike.

Bring God into the world from the inner sanctuary of your home.

Your Turn:

Choose a Bible verse to print out (or write out) and hang it in your home. In the comments below, share the verse you chose and tell me why you chose it.

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Stay informed about issues affecting Israel, the Jewish people, Jewish-Christian relations, receive daily devotionals, and more.