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Strengthening the Holy Land - One Woman at a Time

Looking at Tadela today, you would never guess all that she's been through her birth into a poor Jewish family in Ethiopia…losing her parents at a young age…starting life over in Israel, where she had to learn a new language and a whole new way of life.

"I am now a mother, a wife, and a nurse's aide," she says with a confident smile. "And I'm a role model for other young Ethiopian women who long to have a professional career as a way to break free from the poverty that plagues our community." Tadela credits her success to the training she received from a Fellowship project.

Ethiopian Jews who move to Israel are thrilled to be in their biblical homeland, a place that offers spiritual sanctuary and economic opportunities unheard of in their native country. But the transition from a poor farming culture to a first-world nation that speaks another language is often very difficult – especially for women, who often weren't literate or expected to work in Ethiopia.

Those women who do make the tough transition and find work often must settle for low-paying housekeeping jobs that barely support their families. This was the reality Tadela faced, struggling alongside her husband to support their two daughters on minimum-wage work.

Thankfully, she learned about The Fellowship-funded Herzog Nurses' Aid program, which trains Ethiopian immigrants in the nursing field. There is a big demand for nurses' aides, and the Fellowship program has been very successful in finding work at various hospitals across Israel for graduates of the program.

Tadela graduated last year and landed a fulltime job in the geriatric ward of Jerusalem's Herzog Hospital. In caring for Israel's elderly, Tadela is caring for her family as well – meeting their needs and showing her daughters the value of education and hard work. "This course has changed my life," she says.

Tadela's success has not only helped her break free from the cycle of poverty, it has had a ripple effect on her community as well. Tadela is surrounded by neighbors who also migrated from Ethiopia and are desperately looking for a way to achieve economic stability.

"Almost all my friends work as house cleaners and barely make enough money to feed their kids," Tadela explains. "They are all proud women who work hard; they just need someone to give them a chance to succeed. For me and so many others in the Ethiopian community, that someone is The Fellowship."

Please help women like Tadela break out of the cycle of poverty that has such a devastating impact on them, their children, and, consequently, their entire community. When you help a woman gain valuable skills to earn a living wage for her family, you are strengthening the very fabric of Israeli society – and reminding God's precious daughters that they are valuable and loved.