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Israeli Black Hole Could Win Hawking First Nobel

Stephen Hawking (Photo: flickr/nasahqphoto)

Four decades have passed since the Stephen Hawking created a hypothesis on black holes. In that time, the famed British physicist has never won a Nobel Prize for his work. But now, reports The Times of Israel, Hawking could well win his first such award thanks to Israeli research:

In 1974, Hawking hypothesized that black holes are slowly evaporating, challenging the conventional understanding that nothing could escape from the void of a black hole.

The theory, known as Hawking Radiation, suggests that subatomic light particles are sometimes ejected back out of a black hole, taking with them tiny amounts of energy, resulting in a gradual decrease in its mass over time until it evaporates completely.

But more than 40 years later, no one had been able to prove Hawkings theory, mainly because light particles from black holes are too small to be detected from Earth.

Enter Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Physics Professor Jeff Steinhauer. Last year, he and his team of researchers recreated the conditions of a black hole in a lab using sound waves in order to study how subatomic particles behave on its edge, known as an event horizon...

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