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Iranian Nuclear Deal, Part 5: Dismantlement

Today we conclude this week’s five-part look at the requirements that must be met for a meaningful nuclear agreement with Iran – a deal whose deadline is next week. The final condition the Islamic Republic would need to meet would be to dismantle its nuclear infrastructure so it would be left with no path to a nuclear weapon – a grave concern, as The New York Times’ David E. Sanger and William J. Broad report that Iran’s nuclear stockpile is growing:

The extent to which Iran’s stockpile has increased was documented in a report issued Friday by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations organization that monitors compliance with nuclear treaties. The agency’s inspectors, who have had almost daily access to most of Iran’s nuclear production facilities, reported finding no evidence that Iran was racing toward a nuclear weapon, and said Tehran had halted work on facilities that could have given it bomb-making capabilities.

The overall increase in Iran’s stockpile poses a major diplomatic and political challenge for President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry, who flew back to the United States from Geneva on Monday for treatment of a broken leg he suffered in a bicycling accident, as they enter a 30-day push to try to complete an agreement by the end of June. In essence, the administration will have to convince Congress and America’s allies that Iran will shrink its stockpile by 96 percent in a matter of months after a deal is signed, even while it continues to produce new material and has demonstrated little success in reducing its current stockpile…

Tags: Nuclear Weapons , Iran

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