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Anne Frank's Earlier Death Dispels Notion She Could Have Been Saved

It was long believed that the death of teenage diarist and Holocaust victim, Anne Frank, occurred close enough to the end of World War II that the young girl might have been saved. The Times of Israel reports on new research that revises the date of Anne’s passing and disputes that long-held notion:

Teenage Jewish diarist Anne Frank likely died of typhus in a Nazi concentration camp about a month earlier than previously thought, the Amsterdam museum that honors her memory said Tuesday on the 70th anniversary of the officially recognized date of her death. And this finding, researcher Erika Pins said, dispels the notion that she might have been rescued had she lived a little longer.

Anne likely died, aged 15, at Bergen-Belsen camp in February 1945, said Prins, a researcher at the Anne Frank House museum…

The new date of her death changes little about the tragic lives of Anne and her sister Margot, who went into hiding with their family in an Amsterdam canal house but were eventually betrayed, sent to Nazi concentration camps and died in the Holocaust along with millions of other Jews.

“It was horrible. It was terrible. And it still is,” Prins said.

But she said the new date lays to rest the idea that the sisters could have been rescued if they had lived just a little longer.

“When you say they died at the end of March, it gives you a feeling that they died just before liberation. So maybe if they’d lived two more weeks …,” Prins said, her voice trailing off. “Well, that’s not true anymore.”

Tags: Holocaust , History

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