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Young Terror Victims Celebrate Hanukkah in Jerusalem

female youth, lighting menorah, hanukah IFCJ

On Tuesday, thousands of Israeli children, who have been recent victims of terror attacks, celebrated Hanukkah together and gave thanks for a healthy recovery. The celebration was sponsored by one of Jerusalem's hospitals, which IFCJ has partnered with for many years. Writers at the Times of Israel tell us more about the event:

The young terror victims were greeted by clowns, musicians and other entertainers at Jerusalem’s Cinema City complex before lighting the third Hanukkah candle, the NRG news website reported.

Among the event’s participants were 3-year-old Tahal Sofer, who sustained burn injuries when Palestinian assailants hurled firebombs at her family’s car near the West Bank settlement of Beit El in October.

Also in attendance was 13-year-old Naor Ben-Ezra, who was critically injured when two Palestinian teenagers stabbed him as he rode his bike in Jerusalem’s Pisgat Ze’ev neighborhood in October.

Both Sofer and Ben-Ezra were treated in Hadassah’s pediatric wing.

“My own Hanukkah miracle is that I am here, alive,” Ben-Ezra told reporters. “Hadassa brought me back to life, and so today I light the candles with a great deal of excitement.”

Tags: Stories , Life in Israel

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