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The "Small Wailing Wall"

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Most people know about the Western Wall (also known as the Wailing Wall), a portion of the retaining wall that once surrounded the Second Temple in Jerusalem. It’s considered the holiest site in all Judaism, and Jews from around the world flock to this sacred site to lift their prayers to God.

But did you know that there’s another portion of the wall that remains and is considered by some even more sacred, as it was situated closer to the Holy of Holies?

It is called the “Small Wailing Wall” (hakotel hakatan) and is open to all. There is even room there for notes to God, while at the traditional site every nook and cranny is crammed full with tiny scraps of paper.

This important site is found off HaGuy Street inside the Old City walls, a byway replete with bustling markets and historic buildings. To get there, you enter the Old City at Damascus Gate, descend to the bottom and take the street on the left to HaGuy, which is bursting with colorful shops that range from women’s clothing stores to sweet-smelling spice stands. HaGuy street is crowded and has you rubbing shoulders with people from every possible walk of life.

Read more about this sacred site.

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More than 60 Fellowship supporters join Rabbi Eckstein and Fellowship staff on a tour of Israel, which includes visits to project areas and biblical and historic sites in the Holy Land.

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The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (IFCJ) funds humanitarian aid to the needy in Israel and in Jewish communities around the world, promotes prayer and advocacy on behalf of the Jewish state, and provides resources that help build bridges of understanding between Christians and Jews.

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