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Let's Make Hummus!

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Hummus is a popular  appetizer, side dish, or main course in Israel, and in recent years, it's become popular in the United States, as well. It comes in a variety of flavors, and tastes best when eaten with warm pita bread. This recipe is for a basic hummus, but you can always spice it up by adding extra ingredients, like sliced red chilis or cayenne pepper!


  • 1 16 oz can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans
  • ¼ cup liquid from can of chickpeas
  • 3-5 tablespoons lemon juice (depending on taste)
  • 1 ½ tablespoons tahini
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil


Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid from can. Combine remaining ingredients in blender or food processor. Add 1/4 cup of liquid from chickpeas.

Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.

Place in serving bowl, and create a shallow well in the center of the hummus.

Add a small amount (1-2 tablespoons) of olive oil in the well. Garnish with parsley (optional).

Serve immediately with fresh, warm, or toasted pita bread, or cover and refrigerate.

Note: For a spicier hummus, add a sliced red chile or a dash of cayenne pepper.

Tags: Recipes

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