Skip Navigation

IFCJ Gives Grants to Turkey Terror Victims' Families

Kobi Gideon

In light of the recent terror attack in Turkey, the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (IFCJ) will provide $1,000 US dollar grants to each family afflicted by the attack. The goal of this assistance is to provide families, whose loved ones were killed or wounded in the attack, with an immediate grant to help cover unexpected medical bills, unpaid missed days of work, transportation to and from the hospital, and other needs.

Thankfully, in the past six months, IFCJ has provided 150 families with terror grants; while we cannot take away the pain of losing a loved one, we hope these grants will at least provide some support and remind these families that they are not alone in their suffering. As we continue to pray for peace, hoping the terror attacks will end soon, we feel so blessed for our many Christian and Jewish friends around the world who continue to support us as we bring aid to these families.

Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein shared, “IFCJ is committed to the peace and well-being of each Jew. In recent years we have contributed millions to protect Jewish institutions around the world, and will continue to stand by our brethren in good times and in bad.”

Tags: Crisis and Need

Previous Post

Next Post

More than 60 Fellowship supporters join Rabbi Eckstein and Fellowship staff on a tour of Israel, which includes visits to project areas and biblical and historic sites in the Holy Land.

Visit Israel

Here you’ll find an array of useful information on accommodations, transportation, exchanging currency, Israel's climate and customs, and much more. So get the most out of your trip to Israel with the help of The Fellowship.

Read More

About The Fellowship

The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (IFCJ) funds humanitarian aid to the needy in Israel and in Jewish communities around the world, promotes prayer and advocacy on behalf of the Jewish state, and provides resources that help build bridges of understanding between Christians and Jews.

Read More