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Rare Coin From Fourth Year of Jewish Revolt Found in Ancient Jerusalem Drain

Kidron Valley view north from City of David_14221281 Kidron Valley view north from City of David (Photo: bibleplaces.com)

Could this newly discovered ancient coin found in an excavation near the City of David have been left behind by a Jewish rebel hiding from Roman soldiers in the sewers? Writing at Haaretz, Ruth Schuster reports on this new artifact, which gives us a peek into Jewish history:

A rare coin minted in the year 69 – the fourth year of the Jewish revolt against Rome and the year in which the rebels despaired – was found last week while sifting debris that originated in the City of David. It was discovered in the sewage system running beneath ancient Jerusalem, passing beneath the main road of the ancient city some 2,000 years ago, Reut Vilf of the City of David Foundation told Haaretz. . .

“The coin was found exactly in the same place that Jews had been hiding in the drainage channel under the street,” Vilf says. Solid evidence of the rebels' attempt to hide includes intact oil lamps for light and ceramic cooking pots that were found tellingly whole in the sewer itself.

“These objects couldn’t have fallen down there. They would have shattered. Since they were found whole, somebody had to put them down there deliberately,” Vilf pointed out. Excavators even found a Roman sword there.

Tags: Facts and Findings

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