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Modern Technology Unlocks Secrets of a Damaged Biblical Scroll

(Photo: IFCJ)

Writers at the New York Times tell us more about a new technology that will allow researchers to read ancient biblical scrolls that were once too damaged to decipher.

Nearly half a century ago, archaeologists found a charred ancient scroll in the ark of a synagogue on the western shore of the Dead Sea.

The lump of carbonized parchment could not be opened or read. Its curators did nothing but conserve it, hoping that new technology might one day emerge to make the scroll legible.

Just such a technology has now been perfected by computer scientists at the University of Kentucky. Working with biblical scholars in Jerusalem, they have used a computer to unfurl a digital image of the scroll.

It turns out to hold a fragment identical to the Masoretic text of the Hebrew Bible and, at nearly 2,000 years old, is the earliest instance of the text.

Tags: Facts and Findings

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