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Let’s Make Matzah Ball Soup!

Matzah ball soup (Photo: IFCJ)

Matzah, or the traditional unleavened bread Jews eat during Passover, can be transformed into a soup dumpling by adding eggs, water, and oil. This soup originates from the Ashkenazi Jews (Jews from France, Germany, and Eastern Europe) and is great to make during the winter.

Directions

Beat the eggs, oil and water together thoroughly. Add the matzah meal, parsley and black pepper and mix until you achieve an even consistency. Let this sit for a few minutes, so the matzah meal absorbs the other ingredients, and stir again.

Bring the broth to a vigorous boil, then reduce the heat until the broth is just barely boiling. Wet your hands and make balls of about 1-2 tbsp. of the batter. Drop the balls gently into the boiling water. They will be cooked enough to eat in about 15 minutes; however, you may want to leave it simmering longer to absorb more of the chicken broth flavor. They are done when they float on top of the broth and look bloated.

For lighter matzah balls, use a little less oil, a little more water, and cook at a lower temperature for a longer time. For heavier matzah balls, do the reverse.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup matzah meal
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp. oil or schmaltz (melted chicken fat)
  • 2 tbsp. water or chicken broth
  • 2 tbsp. fresh chopped parsley
  • black pepper
  • 2 quarts thin chicken broth

Tags: Recipes

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