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Meat Borscht

Directions

Meat borscht comes from Russia and is a winter favorite. It is cooked for several hours on a low flame and its pungent aroma penetrates every corner of the home. It has become popular to serve hot borscht at parties at the stroke of midnight. No one wanting to miss this treat will go home before that hour. The influx of thousands of newcomers from the former Soviet Union in recent years has reinforced the popularity of the various types of borscht in Israel.

Combine water, meat and bones in a deep saucepan. Bring to a boil and skim. Add beets, cabbage, tomato puree, onions, garlic and salt. Cover and cook over medium heat for 2 hours. Add brown sugar and lemon juice. Cook for an additional 30 minutes. Taste to correct seasoning.

Beat eggs in a bowl. Gradually add a little hot soup, beating steadily to prevent curdling. Return to saucepan. Serve hot. Serves 8-10.

Ingredients

  • 3 quarts water
  • 2 lbs. brisket
  • beef bones
  • 8 beets, grated
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tbs. salt
  • 3 tbs. brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1/2-15oz. can tomato puree
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cabbage, shredded

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Tarato (Yogurt Soup)

Tarato comes from Bulgaria. The Jews of Bulgaria, like those of Holland, Greece, Turkey, and Italy, are descended from Jews expelled from Spain and Portugal in the 15th century. This cold soup is particularly suitable for hot summer nights in Israel. Yogurt, the main ingredient, has been a popular food in Israel for many years.

Meat Borscht

Meat borscht comes from Russia and is a winter favorite. It is cooked for several hours on a low flame and its pungent aroma penetrates every corner of the home. It has become popular to serve hot borscht at parties at the stroke of midnight. No one wanting to miss this treat will go home before that hour. The influx of thousands of newcomers from the former Soviet Union in recent years has reinforced the popularity of the various types of borscht in Israel.