Skip Navigation

Falafel (Chick-pea patties)


Falafel is sold on street corners in every city and town in Israel. Some call it the "Israeli hamburger." Its popularity can be attributed in no small part to the Yemenite Jews who have brought a particularly tasty version onto the culinary scene. Students living on a meager budget consume full-portion falafels in whole pitas on the sidewalks as their noon "dinner."

Combine chick-peas with onion. Add parsley, lightly beaten egg and spices. Mix in blender. Add breadcrumbs until mixture forms a small ball without sticking to your hands. Form chick-pea mixture into small balls about the size of a quarter (one inch in diameter). Flatten patties slightly and fry until golden brown on both sides. Drain falafel balls on paper towels. Serve individually with toothpicks as an hors d'oeuvre or as a sandwich filling with chopped tomato, cucumber, radish, lettuce, onion, hummus and/or tehina inside pita bread. Makes about 24 falafel balls.


  • 1 lb. canned chick-peas (drained)
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 tbs. finely chopped parsley
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 to 1 cup breadcrumbs or fine bulgar (crushed wheat)
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander or cumin
  • 1 tsp. dried hot red peppers
  • 1 tsp. garlick powder
  • vegetable oil (for frying)

Sweet Round Challah

The traditional holiday and Sabbath bread called challah is usually braided all year long.  On the High Holidays, we make the challah round instead in order to symbolize a whole and perfect year ahead of us.

Mint Tea

There is nothing like this drink to quench the thirst in Israel's hot climate. During the summer months (June through September) people look for ways to overcome the effects of the heat. The natural mint leaves which many Israelis grow at home are favored as a cooling addition to tea and vegetable salads.

Turkish Coffee

Turkish coffee seems to taste best when prepared in the traditional feenjan, but a deep saucepan will do, sized according to how many cups you wish to make. Feenjans can be bought in Eastern specialty shops the pot is wide at the bottom, narrow toward the top, and has a long handle. Turkish coffee should be served in small cylindrical cups; espresso cups are suitable.