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Meat Cholent (Shabbat)

Directions

Cholent, a heavy stew, became the answer to the age-old problem of how to have nourishing hot food on the Sabbath without violating injunctions in Jewish law. Since it is permitted to prepare food in advance and keep it warm in an oven lit before the Sabbath began, cholent, which it is not impaired by long, slow cooking (indeed the process improves the flavor), was adopted as the principal Sabbath food in eastern Europe.

In Israel, cholent has become exceedingly popular with every segment of the population. There are even restaurants where one sees lines of customers standing with pot-in-hand waiting for their turn to get "take-home" cholent.

Cholent is served only on weekends. Anyone who partakes of this dish will understand why. It is a thick, heavy, and filling food which induces sleep.

Soak the beans overnight in water. Drain. Use a heavy saucepan or Dutch oven and brown meat and onions in the fat (or margarine). Sprinkle with salt, pepper and ginger. Add beans, barley, small potatoes (peeled) and sprinkle with flour and paprika. Place uncooked eggs in shells on top. Add enough boiling water to cover one inch above the mixture. Cover tightly. Cholent may be baked for 24 hours at 250 degrees Fahrenheit (125 degrees Celsius) or for quicker cooking, bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees Celsius) for 4-5 hours. Serves 8-10.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dried lima beans
  • 3 lbs. brisket
  • 3 onions, diced
  • 2 tsp. paprika
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. ginger
  • 2 tbs. flour
  • 8 small potatoes (peeled)
  • 1 cup pearled barley
  • 8 eggs (uncooked)
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbs. fat or margarine

Apple Kugel (Apple Pudding)

Apples are a traditional food and is accompanied by a prayer recited just before eating them. Additionally, apples are traditionally incorporated into the recipes of the festive meal itself

Keftes de Prasa (Leek Patties)

This is a tradition to celebrate Rosh HaShanah and also as a sign of spring.

Ashkenazi Haroset

Haroset is a mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine, which are finely chopped or blended into a paste-like consistency. Haroset is meant to look like the mortar that the enslaved Israelites were forced to use to build Egyptian cities. However, haroset tastes sweet, which reminds us that even in bitter times, we can always find something sweet in our lives and that bitter times are eventually followed by the sweetness of salvation.