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Honey Cake


Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a large bowl, combine eggs, honey, and sugar; mix well. Add baking soda to coffee. Add to mixer with oil. Add remaining ingredients and beat well. Pour into greased tube pan. Bake at 325 degrees for one hour, or until done.


  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup honey
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda (mix into coffee)
  • 1 cup warm coffee
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 3/4 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon


On Fridays, you can smell the distinct aroma of rugelach on every street corner in Israel. People anxious to buy them for the weekend will line up at their neighborhood bakery to get them hot out of the oven. Unfortunately, due to their small size, there never seems to be enough of these delicious pastries to go around.

Sponge Cake

This is the traditional cake of Israel - and it is exceedingly popular. It has no Hebrew name but is called the European designation, tort. This cake appears in many shades and is covered in a variety of ways. A typical method involves cutting the cake horizontally in two and covering it with fresh strawberries (for which Israel is famous), jelly and whipped cream.


In Israel, all young men and women are required to enlist for military service at the age of 18. The soldiers, who manage to get home only once every several weeks, enjoy getting parcels with sweet things from home; and mothers are very efficient in keeping them well-supplied with cakes. Derived from central Europe, the popular kichlach are to be found in many of the packages destined for young soldiers. No adequate substitute has so far been found for the homemade product. The word kichlach is Yiddish for cookies.