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Sponge Cake


This is the traditional cake of Israel - and it is exceedingly popular. It has no Hebrew name but is called the European designation, tort. This cake appears in many shades and is covered in a variety of ways. A typical method involves cutting the cake horizontally in two and covering it with fresh strawberries (for which Israel is famous), jelly and whipped cream.

Beat egg yolks; gradually add sugar, beating until thick and light in color. Stir in lemon juice and rind.

Beat egg whites and salt until stiff but not dry. Pile on top of the egg yolk mixture. Sift flour mixed with baking powder over egg whites and fold in carefully. Turn into a 10 inch tube pan.

Bake at 325 degrees Fahrenheit for 50 minutes or until browned and free from sides of pan. Invert and let cool.


  • 6 egg yolks
  • 1-1/4 cups sugar
  • 2 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. grated lemon rind
  • 6 egg whites
  • 1/4 tsp.salt
  • 1-1/2 cups sifted cake flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder

Honey Cake

This freshly baked traditional honey cake is served with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet new year.


In Israel, all young men and women are required to enlist for military service at the age of 18. The soldiers, who manage to get home only once every several weeks, enjoy getting parcels with sweet things from home; and mothers are very efficient in keeping them well-supplied with cakes. Derived from central Europe, the popular kichlach are to be found in many of the packages destined for young soldiers. No adequate substitute has so far been found for the homemade product. The word kichlach is Yiddish for cookies.

Honey Cake

Honey cake is the traditional cake of the "Land of Milk and Honey." Honey cake is a must for the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana, since its sweetness symbolizes the wishes for a good year ahead.