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Baba Ganouj (Eggplant with Tehina)

In Israel, it is not unusual for guests to drop in for a visit without prior notice. In such cases, they are likely to get a light snack or impromptu meal. In anticipation of such contingencies, one such prepared dish is baba ghanouj, which can be found in virtually every Israeli refrigerator.

Burekas

This is a Jewish Sephardic dish which is quite similar to the Turkish "burak." Burekas can be prepared with various types of dough: strudel dough (thin leaves), rising dough or with types of prepared dough found in the market. This is a dish served on festive occasions, but also widely sold on Israeli street corners. To be tasty, it must be served hot and fresh.

Chopped Chicken Livers

This is a typical Jewish eastern European dish. The low cost of liver in the U.S. comes as a surprise to Israelis, where chopped chicken livers are considered a delicacy to be served on festive occasions.

Eggplant (Turkish Style)

This is a typical Israeli recipe for eggplant. A popular Arab proverb in the Middle East claims: "A woman who does not know how to prepare eggplant 101 different ways is not yet prepared for marriage."

Falafel (Chick-pea patties)

Falafel is sold on street corners in every city and town in Israel. Some call it the "Israeli hamburger." Its popularity can be attributed in no small part to the Yemenite Jews who have brought a particularly tasty version onto the culinary scene. Students living on a meager budget consume full-portion falafels in whole pitas on the sidewalks as their noon "dinner."

Hummus

Like tehina, hummus was brought to Israel by Jews from Arab countries, though today it is everyone's favorite. It tastes best when eaten with fresh, warm pita bread.

Tehina

A typical dish of the Orient brought to Israel by Jewish refugees from Arab countries. Tehina is a thick dip with sesame seeds as its base. It is often used as a topping for falafel and other dishes.

Vegetable Salad

The idea of salad for breakfast is probably a little strange to North Americans. But this trademark Mediterranean salad is enjoyed by Israelis three times a day -- breakfast, lunch, and dinner -- regardless of whether they are from Russia, Morocco, Yemen, or the United States.

More than 60 Fellowship supporters join Rabbi Eckstein and Fellowship staff on a tour of Israel, which includes visits to project areas and biblical and historic sites in the Holy Land.

Visit Israel

Here you’ll find an array of useful information on accommodations, transportation, exchanging currency, Israel's climate and customs, and much more. So get the most out of your trip to Israel with the help of The Fellowship.

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About The Fellowship

The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (IFCJ) funds humanitarian aid to the needy in Israel and in Jewish communities around the world, promotes prayer and advocacy on behalf of the Jewish state, and provides resources that help build bridges of understanding between Christians and Jews.

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